Snöplog to screen in Chile

Private Cinema Installation at DFFUKIt seems that more intimate, monitor-based screenings are the popular choice for Snöplog.

After making an appearance in the Private Cinema Installation at DFFUK in London this summer, Snöplog will be screened at FIVC, Festival Internacional de Videodanza de Chile, in Santiago de Chile, this November.

The film will be part of the FIVC OFF selection, shown as an installation in the Centro Cultural de España for the four days of the festival, 24-27 November 2015.

 

Published!

IJSC vol 4 cover

The International Journal of Screendance Volume 4 is now online, including my essay

“Cutting across the century: an investigation of the close up and the long-shot in “cine-choreography” since the invention of the camera.”

Really looking forward to some fascinating reading material!

Do have a look and let me know your thoughts.

 

“Pressed against the inside of the celluloid.”

(Thank you Ryan M. McKelvey).

With one week to go until my first performance of Portrait, there is still much to do. I am working on honing the content/ movement material for the second part of the performance.

A preview of the work yesterday at a feedback session brought up some exciting and rich references, including Yvonne Rainer’s Hand Movie of 1966, and Kate Chopin’s novel, The Awakening.

One of the ideas that has created the form for the second part of the performance is the reflection that in our current lives we are constantly trying to get into screens – to become the image inside the device. I find it interesting that early on in its history – before its role as a PR tool was really discovered – the photograph was considered an objective document and was used ‘scientifically’ for categorisation and cataloguing. Now, whilst we talk about ‘documenting’ our lives and our work, it is almost as if we are in a state of constant becoming inside of our devices, rather than living outside them. Perhaps, in this second part of Portrait, I am inside the device, trying to find out its limits, as Ryan suggested “pressed against the inside of the celluloid.”

Which brought up Jenny Saville’s wonderful work…

Closed Contact #8 1995-1996

Closed Contact #14

And the idea of the camera as a lifeline, as in the film 127 Hours.

Old notes about Figure (s) 2

Points of departure

At once energetic, totemic, classical, abstracted (some more than others) and celebratory.

  • Stuttgart, Neue Staatsgalerie, Henry Moore: Di...

    This is a description I wrote of some of Henry Moore’s Reclining Figures that were exhibited in the gardens at Hatfield House during the summer of 2012.  The figures, mostly female, are reclining, however they emanate both a sense of groundedness, their totemic limbs firmly planted into the floor (or the plinth), and a feeling that they are just on the brink of movement.  Looking at other classical representations  – in the Western art tradition – of the female form, Titian’s Venus of Urbino, Gotzius’ The Sleeping Danae Being Prepared to Receive Jupiter, I notice a softness and fluidity of form that contrasts the energy and strength in the Moores.  Taking this contrast as a starting point, I wanted to investigate how these two physicalities both feel – to embody them – and look.

  • How might sound score the sculptural body, and the sculpting body score sound?  The relationship with a soundscape/or score, or the idea of scoring the sound on/with the body has something to do with the materiality of Moore’s forms and their weight, of the potential energy and movement in them, contradicted by their weighted still nature as bronze, or stone.  In an early conversation with artists Vv and Jennie Howell, we talked about finding a way to express the “resonance of mass”, its “sonic weight”.